Managing technical debt has been one of the most emerging problems for the current general of software testers, especially those organizations that develop and maintain large software systems. Similar to a bad debt in the financial industry, the term was devised by Ward Cunningham to draw an analogy with financial debt to indicate how incurring debt in the short run is beneficial but hurts badly in the long run if not repaid. Basically, the term was meant to remedy the practice of making non-optimal technical decisions.

There is no doubt that software testing has come a long way since a few decades back when the role of the tester was very specific and limited. This period may be regarded as the most exciting yet challenging times that a tester is going through. Those who are able to handle and convert these challenges into opportunities clearly have a strong road laid ahead of them both for the products they are working on and for their own personal careers.

Big Data and Analytics testing involve unstructured input data, data formats and types, processing and storage mechanisms as well as software and products that are completely new. This requires new abilities and skills, the building of new toolsets and instrumentations which are beyond the scope of traditional testing.

Being one of the most sought-after jobs in the 21stcentury, software test engineering can provide for an interesting and challenging work assignment and career. In addition, there is high demand in the marketplace for test engineering skills, which offers testers to use their programming and database skills, doing a variety of work and learning lot of things in the process.

Things are evolving by the day in the technology space and the ones that are able to maintain an edge for themselves are not the ones that look just at the present but also plan for the future and incorporate them into the present. The present sets the base for the future with the current planning that is taking up.

Mr Niranjan Limbachiya CEO, KiwiQA talked about KiwiQA journey, learning, personal challenges, company values, changes to the organisation, leaders admires, surprising things to know about him, future growth and finally about healthy work-life balance. 

You can connect with him on Linkedin.

Manual software testing has been the cornerstone of software testing ever since software testing was set up. All test engineers and software QA staff, developers and programmers test their code manually, at least to some degree. Though it is a critical element of software testing, it is certainly not the be-all and end-all. 

Why would it be advisable for you to test your web applications? In what capacity would it be a good idea for you to test your web applications? How to work out a reasonable start-up programming testing system? These are not single answer questions. A few organizations don’t fret over testing by any means, despite the fact that the essential target of any bit of programming is to give smooth running.

Choosing the right automation testing tool could be a tough job. At times, choosing the wrong tool could lead to results which are unexpected and unforeseen, besides there being significant technical difficulties in making the tool work in your environment. Situations like these will, at best, set back your test automation efforts and may also sabotage them for some time. This podcast provides some tips on selecting the right automation tool for your business.

There is no doubt that software testing has come a long way since a few decades back when the role of the tester was very specific and limited.Those who are able to handle and convert these challenges into opportunities clearly have a strong road laid ahead of them both for the products they are working on and for their own personal careers.

In this podcast, we look at what other tasks a tester should take on in addition to his core testing responsibilities.